"

A culture that prizes narcissism above individualism. A politics that places “tolerance” above acceptance. A spirit that encourages cynicism over reverence. A public sphere that places irony over sincerity. A technosophy that elevates “data” over understanding. A society that puts “opportunity” before decency. An economy that…you know. Works us harder to make us poorer at “jobs” we hate where we make stuff that sucks every last bit of passion from our souls to sell to everyone else who’s working harder to get poorer at “jobs” they hate where they make stuff that sucks every last bit of passion from their souls.

To be bored isn’t to be indifferent. It is to be fatigued. Because one is exhausted. And that is precisely where—and only where—the values above lead us. To exhaustion; with the ceaseless, endless, meaningless work of maintaining the fiction. Of pretending that who we truly want to be is what everyone believes everyone else wants to be. Liked, not loved; “attractive”, not beautiful; clever, not wise; snarky, not happy; advantaged, not prosperous.

It exhausts us; literally; this game of parasitically craving everyone’s cravings. It makes us adversaries not of one another; but of ourselves. Until there is nothing left. Not of us as we are; but of the people we might have been. The values above shrink and reduce and diminish our potential; as individuals, as people, societies. And so I have grown fatigued by them.

"

Uamir Haque - The Bullshit Machine (via worsethandetroit)

kenbocalrissian:

shehasathree:

kanthia:

raggediestandi:

itsvondell:

off-in-lala-land:

You know, if I was a parent, it would be at this point that I’d rip the game from his hands, stash it in my backpack, and force him to enjoy history goddamnit. This vacation cost a lot and the game is only for the hotel and travel time.

imagine trying to force someone to think that stonehenge is fun

"look kid we’re a ridiculous distance from a bunch of broken rocks how could you possibly be bored this is totally an appropriate vacation spot for someone this age."

Ah, fuck. Shit like this always gets to me, the tired old technophobe spiel and maybe it’s because it’s so rampant in my field (I work in outdoor education), but it just starts feeling so goddamn derivative after a while, nouveau hipsters who think the world is ending because kids play too many video games.
But what we’re missing is that this kid’s parents bought him his SP and a copy of Leaf Green (the employee at the game store said it would be perfect for him) so that he would shut up on the plane ride over and not bother them in the hotel, imagining that as soon as they touched down the kid would put the thing down and appreciate all the castles and grass and cafes and operas and rocks and ~*~culture~*~, because that’s what culture and history are, right? A bunch of old rocks.
What they missed is this kid staying up way past his bedtime the night before their plane flew out on message boards and chat rooms trying to find out which is the best starter, finally settled on a Squirtle and named it Rocky, and right now while his parents are appreciating rocks he and Rocky have got to save the whole world from Team Rocket because he’s a hero and that’s what heroes do and he’s so invested in this story and this world, he thinks he might have found the place where Machops live, why should he care about a guide droning on about Romans and a bunch of old people taking pictures?But please, go ahead and take the Gameboy from him, break it in half and remind him that you spent A LOT on this vacation, and HOW DARE HE. You will FORCE him to ENJOY his GODDAMN VACATION because it’s REAL LIFE. Wonder why he’s so upset, you’re the one who spent money on the thing? All he invested in it was time and emotion, and those things are definitely less important than money, when you’re eight. Wonder why he’s so disconnected from education, when you’ve managed to turn it into a punishment, a deprivation, a source of misery? Go on and repeat the tired old technophobe line until you’re red in the face, share it on Facebook and reblog it on Tumblr and retweet it on Twitter: nobody but you knows how to live ~*~REAL LIFE~*~ because we’re so busy exploring imaginary worlds.
Kids don’t just need to be taught when to use devices, we as their parents and guardians also need to be taught why they use devices. If a kid is more invested in Kanto than Stonehenge, why? How can we change our approach so kids ~*~appreciate real history~*~? And if not, can’t we just accept and appreciate that this kid will go back to the third grade, say “Yeah, I saw Stonehenge, it was neat, but who wants to trade a Haunter for my Machoke?”

the commentary!

That was quite possibly the most effective argument on the subject I’ve ever read!  Thank you, that was an eye-opening perspective… even as one who plays video games all the time, I don’t think I could have come to the same conclusion.

kenbocalrissian:

shehasathree:

kanthia:

raggediestandi:

itsvondell:

off-in-lala-land:

You know, if I was a parent, it would be at this point that I’d rip the game from his hands, stash it in my backpack, and force him to enjoy history goddamnit. This vacation cost a lot and the game is only for the hotel and travel time.

imagine trying to force someone to think that stonehenge is fun

"look kid we’re a ridiculous distance from a bunch of broken rocks how could you possibly be bored this is totally an appropriate vacation spot for someone this age."

Ah, fuck. Shit like this always gets to me, the tired old technophobe spiel and maybe it’s because it’s so rampant in my field (I work in outdoor education), but it just starts feeling so goddamn derivative after a while, nouveau hipsters who think the world is ending because kids play too many video games.

But what we’re missing is that this kid’s parents bought him his SP and a copy of Leaf Green (the employee at the game store said it would be perfect for him) so that he would shut up on the plane ride over and not bother them in the hotel, imagining that as soon as they touched down the kid would put the thing down and appreciate all the castles and grass and cafes and operas and rocks and ~*~culture~*~, because that’s what culture and history are, right? A bunch of old rocks.

What they missed is this kid staying up way past his bedtime the night before their plane flew out on message boards and chat rooms trying to find out which is the best starter, finally settled on a Squirtle and named it Rocky, and right now while his parents are appreciating rocks he and Rocky have got to save the whole world from Team Rocket because he’s a hero and that’s what heroes do and he’s so invested in this story and this world, he thinks he might have found the place where Machops live, why should he care about a guide droning on about Romans and a bunch of old people taking pictures?

But please, go ahead and take the Gameboy from him, break it in half and remind him that you spent A LOT on this vacation, and HOW DARE HE. You will FORCE him to ENJOY his GODDAMN VACATION because it’s REAL LIFE. Wonder why he’s so upset, you’re the one who spent money on the thing? All he invested in it was time and emotion, and those things are definitely less important than money, when you’re eight. Wonder why he’s so disconnected from education, when you’ve managed to turn it into a punishment, a deprivation, a source of misery? Go on and repeat the tired old technophobe line until you’re red in the face, share it on Facebook and reblog it on Tumblr and retweet it on Twitter: nobody but you knows how to live ~*~REAL LIFE~*~ because we’re so busy exploring imaginary worlds.

Kids don’t just need to be taught when to use devices, we as their parents and guardians also need to be taught why they use devices. If a kid is more invested in Kanto than Stonehenge, why? How can we change our approach so kids ~*~appreciate real history~*~? And if not, can’t we just accept and appreciate that this kid will go back to the third grade, say “Yeah, I saw Stonehenge, it was neat, but who wants to trade a Haunter for my Machoke?”

the commentary!

That was quite possibly the most effective argument on the subject I’ve ever read!  Thank you, that was an eye-opening perspective… even as one who plays video games all the time, I don’t think I could have come to the same conclusion.

(Source: plainpictures, via pkmntrainerj)

xombiedirge:

Kurt Russell Triptych screen print WIP roughs by Chris Weston

(via mattfractionblog)

kierongillen:

GPOY, etc.

kierongillen:

GPOY, etc.

"Conspiracy theories and the occult comfort us because they present models of the world that more easily make sense than the world itself, and, regardless of how dark or threatening, are inherently less frightening."

— William Gibson, Distrust That Particular Flavor (via angelacarterofmars)

(via worsethandetroit)

Been there.

Been there.

(Source: textsfromtng, via textsfromtng)

wolfgurl25:

theinternerdcave:

sermisty:

dean-bangs-cas-in-the-impala:

epic-kuma:

feathers-theangel:

1los:

Hold Close - IngridTan

excuse you did you just make me cry over a flame and a drop of water

brb, crying

I remember I cried over this like a baby.

When I think I have cried over every possible thing on earth I discover it’s not true

Masterpiece

My feels..

(via pkmntrainerj)

schmautojoy:

kris-mtg:

owlturdcomix:

We go forward.

That setup. Those feels.

Woah. This is pretty special. <3

(via inkytasty)

You’re the IT guy, right?

devopsreactions:

by alexp-fc

doublefine:

Double Fine is pleased to announce that, along with the console exclusive PlayStation 4 and Vita versions of Grim Fandango, Manny will also reap once again on PC, Mac, and Linux!

And that’s not all, folks! All versions will be launching simultaneously, so everyone can play on day one and not have to worry about those spoilers you’ve been successfully avoiding for the past fifteen years. (Pro-tip: stay off Twitter.)

But hopefully, after all those years of patience, you can hold out just a BIT longer.

doublefine:

Double Fine is pleased to announce that, along with the console exclusive PlayStation 4 and Vita versions of Grim Fandango, Manny will also reap once again on PC, Mac, and Linux!

And that’s not all, folks! All versions will be launching simultaneously, so everyone can play on day one and not have to worry about those spoilers you’ve been successfully avoiding for the past fifteen years. (Pro-tip: stay off Twitter.)

But hopefully, after all those years of patience, you can hold out just a BIT longer.

(via wornoldhat)

"Since dedicating myself to getting into “superhero shape,” several articles regarding my weight have been brought to my attention. Claims have been made that I’ve been on a strict workout routine regulated by co-stars, whipped into shape by trainers I’ve never met, eating sprouted grains I can’t pronounce and ultimately losing 14 pounds off my 5’3” frame. Losing 14 pounds out of necessity in order to live a healthier life is a huge victory. I’m a petite person to begin with, so the idea of my losing this amount of weight is utter lunacy. If I were to lose 14 pounds, I’d have to part with both arms. And a foot. I’m frustrated with the irresponsibility of tabloid media who sell the public ideas about what we should look like and how we should get there."

Scarlett Johansson for the Huffington Post [x]

More of her brilliant articles can be found here.

(via theshadowsinthesun)

(Source: ramblingraconteur, via kierongillen)

(Source: textsfromtng, via textsfromtng)

(Source: vivalasgomez, via 3liza)

Waiting for indexing to finish for the site to come back up

devopsreactions:

by joneisen

gamesyoumightlike:

Things that are great about rRootage:
1) In 2002 there was no better games machine than a chipped Xbox. Only a fraction of the 999 games that would eventually be release for the system had shown up by then - and of those, there were not enough Halos and too many Tazes and Azuriks. But a chipped box mean the taste of the future that was XBMC. It meant SNES emulation a button press away. It meant the first wild stirrings of an indie scene reborn. It meant rRootage. 
2) I’m not kidding about that indie scene reborn thing. Bennet Foddy has spoken compellingly about how indie games have been a consistent, unceasing element of the videogame scene from its earliest days, but there’s no denying that in the early 2000s that world felt pretty distant. Looking back at early IGF winners is a slightly spooky experience - I can’t say I remember Bad Milk or Banja Taiyo, The arrival of games that felt like videogames - proper, fizzy, bad-for-you, never-seen-before videogames - was narcotically exciting. I remember the cascade of astonishment that started with clicking an anonymous looking link and ended with playing things like Samarost and Knytt on my work computer for free.
3) And then rRootage was all of that, but bolted together from the skeletons of three venerable shooters (Ikaruga, Giga Wing and Psyvariar), and playable on a magic black box that could serve up Yoshi’s Island as easily as episode one of some weird TV show about a Baltimore cop with a slightly unconvincing American accent that you’d laboriously downloaded from Usenet. 
4) Oh, and yeah, running the rulesets for those different games through the same shooter engine is another perfect, playable game design masterclass, giving you a perfect glimpse of the skull beneath the skin; the collisions behind the kayfabe. Those are the things that are great about rRootage. 

gamesyoumightlike:

Things that are great about rRootage:

1) In 2002 there was no better games machine than a chipped Xbox. Only a fraction of the 999 games that would eventually be release for the system had shown up by then - and of those, there were not enough Halos and too many Tazes and Azuriks. But a chipped box mean the taste of the future that was XBMC. It meant SNES emulation a button press away. It meant the first wild stirrings of an indie scene reborn. It meant rRootage. 

2) I’m not kidding about that indie scene reborn thing. Bennet Foddy has spoken compellingly about how indie games have been a consistent, unceasing element of the videogame scene from its earliest days, but there’s no denying that in the early 2000s that world felt pretty distant. Looking back at early IGF winners is a slightly spooky experience - I can’t say I remember Bad Milk or Banja Taiyo, The arrival of games that felt like videogames - proper, fizzy, bad-for-you, never-seen-before videogames - was narcotically exciting. I remember the cascade of astonishment that started with clicking an anonymous looking link and ended with playing things like Samarost and Knytt on my work computer for free.

3) And then rRootage was all of that, but bolted together from the skeletons of three venerable shooters (Ikaruga, Giga Wing and Psyvariar), and playable on a magic black box that could serve up Yoshi’s Island as easily as episode one of some weird TV show about a Baltimore cop with a slightly unconvincing American accent that you’d laboriously downloaded from Usenet. 

4) Oh, and yeah, running the rulesets for those different games through the same shooter engine is another perfect, playable game design masterclass, giving you a perfect glimpse of the skull beneath the skin; the collisions behind the kayfabe. Those are the things that are great about rRootage.